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Irish Stout

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An image of a glass of beer

Our site has beer reviews from all around the world, and it’s a small wonder. Beer is the oldest alcoholic drink available, and the options are vast. There are IPAs, the ever timeless bitters, and the crisp and refreshing lagers, but today’s blog post focuses on an oldie but goodie – Irish stout.

How Irish Stout Developed

The legacy and history of Irish stout goes back centuries, creating the most popular Irish dry stout called Guinness. There is growing popularity amongst beer makers to brew more traditional stouts, usually known as dry stouts. Keep in mind that not all stouts originate from Ireland and not all of them are dry.

A typical stout is known for its even and velvety texture, with vigorous flavours of malt and yeast that contribute to its darker hue. Whilst the English developed a taste for paler beers, stouts stayed well-favoured amongst the Irish, with roasted barley and bitter hops highlighting the taste and smell of this beer.

What Does It Look Like?

Irish stout has a coffee-like aroma, with touches of chocolate and caramel. Its colour can range anywhere from a deep brown to black, and the head (or foam) that’s produced is tan in colour. Overall, the look of the beer suggests what it will taste like – bitter with a slight sourness and an aftertaste of chocolate or coffee. Aside from this, a stout should also be smooth to the finish.